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Next Generation GMAT Exam

What Is the Next Generation GMAT Exam?

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The Next Generation GMAT Exam is the most recent evolution in GMAT testing. This newly revamped exam is designed to test integrated reasoning skills in addition to writing, verbal, and quantitative skills.

Next Generation GMAT Exam Launch Date: June 5, 2012

Students who took the test prior to June 5, 2012 were given the "old" GMAT exam. If you took the old exam and are interested in having your integrated reasoning skills tested, you must take the entire Next Generation GMAT Exam. The integrated reasoning section of the test cannot be administered separately from the rest of the exam.

Next Generation GMAT Exam Sections

The Next Generation GMAT Exam has four sections:
  • Analytical Writing Assessment: The AWA consists of a 30-minute writing task. You must write an analytical essay based on a specific prompt. This section is meant to assess your ability to analyze, critique, and assume a position on a particular issue or argument. Scores for the AWA section range from 0 to 6 (in half-point intervals.) A score of 4 is considered average. Many top business schools prefer to see scores in the 5-6 range. The AWA is the only section of the test that can be rescored--most likely because the scores for this section are subjective. If you believe your AWA score is not accurate, you can request that your essay be rescored.
  • Quantitative: The Quantitative section of the Next Generation GMAT consists of 37 multiple choice questions that must be answered within 75 minutes. There are two different types of questions in this section: problem solving and data sufficiency. These questions are designed to test your math knowledge and your ability to analyze and solve quantitative problems. You will also be tested on your ability to determine when there is sufficient data to solve a problem. Quantitative scores range from 0 to 60. A score above 50 is considered rare and exceptional.
  • Verbal: The Verbal section of the Next Generation GMAT consists of 41 questions that must be answered in 75 minutes. There are three types of questions in this section: reading comprehension questions, critical reasoning, and sentence correction questions. These questions are designed to test your language proficiency and your ability to understand what you read and think critically. Verbal scores range from 0 to 60. A score above 44 is considered rare and exceptional.
  • Integrated Reasoning - The Integrated Reasoning section of the Next Generation GMAT is the newest section of the test. This section consists of 12 questions that must be answered in 30 minutes. The questions are in four different formats. You must interpret a graphic, solve a problem with a two-part solution, sort/organize data in a table, or evaluate data sources. (See examples of Integrated Reasoning question formats.) Integrated Reasoning scores range from 1-8. Your official score report will place you in an Integrated Reasoning score percentile, which tells you how your score compares with the scores of other test takers. Your score will never change. However, your percentile could fluctuate depending on the pool of test takers and annual averages.
GMAT vs. Next Generation GMAT Exam

The Next Generation GMAT is very similar to its predecessor. Both tests are timed, each lasting 3 hours, 30 minutes (four hours with breaks.) Both tests have an Analytical Writing, Quantitative, and Verbal section. The Quantitative and Verbal sections are scored the same; the Analytical Writing Assessment is not. The New Generation GMAT Exam streamlines the Analytical Writing portion, taking the section from two essays/60 minutes down to one essay/30 minutes. The open 30 minute period is devoted to the Integrated Reasoning section on the newer exam. Read more about the GMAT vs. the Next Generation GMAT.

How to Prepare for the Next Generation GMAT

Taking time to prepare for the Next Generation GMAT is highly recommended. The makers of the test offer GMAT preparation software as well as an Official Guide For GMAT Review. Some companies also offer fee-based prep courses. If you are energetic and creative, you may want to make your own GMAT prep materials.

How to Register for the Next Generation GMAT

You must register for the Next Generation GMAT before you can take the test. During registration, you will be asked to choose a test center in your area. You will also be asked to submit payment for the test. Cost can vary depending on the country in which you live.

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